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FINRA Considering Rule Changes for Non-Attorneys In Arbitration

FINRA Requests Comment on the Efficacy of Allowing
Compensated Non-Attorneys to Represent Parties in
Arbitration

FINRA Rules do not prohibit non-attorneys from representing parties in arbitrations, although some states do have such a prohibition. While there are some representatives who provide competent advise to parties, there have been a number of issues over the years regarding these non-attorneys.

FINRA is now reviewing this policy and is seeking comment from members and interested parties regarding the use of non-attorneys in arbitrations.

The Regulatory Notice discussing the issue is 17-34.

Interested parties can submit their comments using
the following methods:
0 Emailing comments to pubcom@finra.org.

Read the entire notice before submitting a comment, and please note that the Comment Period Expires December 18, 2017

from SECLaw.com

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FINRA Proposes Expanded Chairperson Qualifications

FINRA has filed a proposed rule change to provide that an attorney arbitrator would be eligible for the chairperson roster if he or she completes chairperson training and serves as an arbitrator through award on at least one arbitration, instead of two arbitrations, administered by a self-regulatory organization (“SRO”) in which hearings were held.




Proposed Rule Change: Broadening Chairperson Eligibility in Arbitration 

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Status of FINRA Arbitration Recommendations

On September 30, 2016, FINRA published a status report detailing the progress on the FINRA Dispute Resolution Task Force recommendations. As of October 19, 2016, FINRA’s Office of Dispute Resolution (ODR) staff had discussed all of the recommendations with the National Arbitration and Mediation Committee (NAMC), FINRA’s Board Advisory Committee on the dispute resolution forum. 


The report is available at the FINRA Dispute Resolution website.

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Feds Ban PDAAs at Federally Funded Nursing Home Facilities

From the Securities Arbitration Commentator:

 “The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has issued final regulations banning nursing homes and long-term care facilities receiving federal funds from using mandatory predispute arbitration agreements.”

Feds Ban PDAAs at Federally Funded Nursing Home Facilities:

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FINRA Proposes Change to Arbitrator Chairperson Qualifications

FINRA’s recent rule change, which effectively removed every attorney with any relevant securities experience from serving as a Chairperson might be negatively effecting the Chairperson roster.

As we discussed in a posting in March, Customer and Firm Attorneys are No Longer Public Arbitrators, since the Chairperson must be a public arbitrator, most securities attorneys were instantly disqualified from serving as a Chairperson. While FINRA’s roster still contains many extremely qualified Chairpersons, the impact on the arbitrator pool has been significant, and placed additional burdens on the remaining qualified Chairpersons.

FINRA has finally filed a proposed rule change to amend  the Code of Arbitration Procedure for both Customer and Industry Disputes which it was discussing back in May of this year. It is proposing to change the rule  to provide that an attorney arbitrator would be eligible for the chairperson roster if he or she completes chairperson training and serves as an arbitrator through award on at least one arbitration, instead of two arbitrations, administered by a self-regulatory organization  in which hearings were held.

This is probably not going to make a significant difference in the Chairperson pool, but it is a start.

SR-FINRA-2016-033 | FINRA.org

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Customer, Firm Attorneys Are Not Public Arbitrators

After years of trying to remove anyone with a past relationship with the securities industry from serving on FINRA arbitration panels as public arbitrators, customer attorneys have
succeeded. The SEC has approved a rule classifying arbitrators with former industry relationships as public arbitrators.

The rule also classified attorneys who spend more than 20% of their time representing customers against the industry as non-public arbitrators.

See the commentary at The Securities Law Blog

http://seclaw.blogspot.com/2015/03/new-arbitrator-rule-customer-and-firm.html